Redwood City recruiting residents, workers to become park stewards

in Community/Featured/Headline

Want to be a champion of your neighborhood park?

Redwood City is recruiting volunteers to become stewards of the parks near to where they live and work as part of a new pilot program.

The program, launching at pilot parks Andrew Spinas (2nd Ave and Bay Road), Sandpiper (Redwood Shores Pkwy and Egret Lane) and Stulsaft (3737 Farm Hill Blvd.), aims to enlist volunteers to play an active role in looking after their neighborhood parks, which can work to build community and boost civic pride.

The so-called Park Champions would organize cleanups and regularly report to the city when the park requires maintenance, such as repairs or new lights, according to the Redwood City Parks, Recreation, and Community Services Department.

Marcella Padilla, chair of the Parks Recreation and Community Services Commission, said the goal is to expand the program so all of the city’s over 30 parks benefit.

“The pilot program will be launched in phases, with Stulsaft Park Champions starting late June, and Andrew Spinas Park and Sandpiper Park beginning this July,” according to the city’s statement.

To learn more about the program, go here: www.redwoodcity.org/ParkChampions

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