Measure H supporters brace for possibility of parcel tax’s defeat

in Community/Featured/Headline

With Measure H, the proposed parcel tax aimed at supporting the cash-strapped Redwood City School District, still falling short of yes votes in the latest election count Tuesday, its supporters are bracing for the reality that it won’t pass.

The measure, a parcel tax of $149 per parcel annually for 12 years, experienced a slight uptick in approval after Tuesday’s count to 66.24 percent, just short of the required supermajority needed of 66.7 percent.

Results from a “small number” of Vote By Mail ballots that remain unreported are set to be released Friday, Nov. 15 and, if necessary, again on Tuesday, Nov. 19.

Measure H supporters don’t believe a defeat of the parcel tax, which would raise an estimated $3.45 million annually for the school district that is reportedly facing a $10 million deficit, would mean the effort went to waste.

“We ran an incredibly strong campaign that brought the District community together at a critical time and empowered emerging parent leaders,” said Jason Galisatus, executive director of the Redwood City Education Foundation. “We hope the outcome of Measure H serves as a call-to action to our parents and the Redwood City community at large that our kids need us to work together to support the District more than ever to put them on the path to success.”

On Facebook, Redwood City resident Lori Palmatier called upon the community to take action.

“Set up a GoFundMe, or just write a check donating to the school district,” she stated on Facebook, adding, “If you feel strongly that this is the way to save RCSD, then don’t let the outcome of this vote stop you.”

The stated purpose of Measure H is to attract and retain highly qualified teachers, support quality reading and writing skills in schools, maintain science technology, engineering and math instruction and reduce class sizes in kindergarten and first grade.

In 2016, Redwood City School District voters approved an $85 per parcel tax that raises $1.9 million annually.

1 Comment

  1. The argument that private funding can save a public school district from a 10 million dollar deficit is laughable. The pattern showing emerald hills opposing funding of city services and public schools is a clear example of white privilege.

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